Team Schmooze crowned as winners !

May 11, 2015

It was my second Hackathon in Outware on 1st May, 2015.  And I’m happy to announce that my team are the winners for the ‘Most Innovative’ category ! Not only did we come out as winners out of the 17 competing teams, we were also the first ever team of Automation test engineers (dominated by) that made the cut.

Schmooze

Schmooze

More about the challenges here.

The Fantastic Four:

Except Celal who is a hardcore iOS specialist others are test engineers specialized in automating mobile apps.

Hari –  Middleware developer

Balaji – Middleware developer

Sivaranjini – App Designer

Celal – iOS developer

The verdict:

This award not only showcases the creative and the technical talent exists in Outware, but also shows what a bunch of individuals who are driven by passion for innovation with lot of hard and team work can do if they chose to wear a different hat for a change.

What an inspiration week !

More about the winners, here.

 

 


Install multiple ipa/app in iOS device using command line

January 31, 2015

This post explains my quest to achieve a solution for iOS devices, similar to batch install in android. Remember my requirement is to smell and taste the coffee rather than installing 18 apps ( multiply that for every dev release + each test device ) sitting in my desk 😉

I used,

  • libimobiledevice for command line deploy
  • And the below script to uninstall and install the apps found in a folder.
#!/bin/bash
for package in `ideviceinstaller -l | grep -i <your-package> | awk '{print $1}'`
do
echo "Uninstalling $package"
ideviceinstaller -U $package >> log
done
for ipa in `ls *ipa`
do
echo "Installing $ipa"
ideviceinstaller -i $ipa >> log
done


Batch install multiple apks

January 26, 2015

There are often a situation where I need to install not few but 18 apps in android for testing. Innumerous devices supported by different versions of android and the bug fixes which translates into more dev and release builds adds more pain to the situation.

As an avid commandline freak, I used the following small script to batch install the apks found in a directory. To use the script, copy all your apks to a dir along with the script and execute it,

I assume adb and aapt in your path already.

#!/bin/bash
$dir=`pwd`
for i in `ls $dir`
do
aapt dump badging $i | perl -ne 'print $2 if /package: name=(.)(.+?)\1/' | xargs -I{} adb uninstall {}
adb install $i
done

You can replace the contents of the for loop with following if you dont worry about reinstalling apps with existing data.

adb install -r $i

Shell Parse Order: Breaking the rules

June 21, 2010

Rules are meant to be broken, hence the Shell parsing order.

There might need arises to skip some of the steps in shell parsing order mentioned in my previous post and we use Quotes ( single & double quotes ) or ‘eval’ command to skip or redo the steps in the parsing order.

Double quotes (“):

Double quotes would run through steps 1, 6, 7, 8 from the parsing order before execution. ie.

1. Tokenize

6. Parameter Substitution

7. Command Substitution

8. Arithmetic Expression

Single Quotes:

Single quotes (‘) would simply skip through all the steps after Tokenize and execute the command.

eval:

While quotes have been used to skip through, the ‘eval’ command has been used to redo the entire sequence of shell parsing once again. ie. The output from the step 11 would be fed to the step 1 and the entire parsing would happen once again.


Understanding the Shell Parsing Order

February 9, 2010

The shell understands the commandline as pipeline and list,

* Pipeline is sequence of one or more commands separated by the character |
* List is sequence of one or more pipelines separated by one of the operators: ; , & , && , ||

For each pipeline it will perform the following steps before executing the command,

1. Tokenize

Splits the commands into tokens that are separated by the fixed set of metacharacters.
Tokens => words, keywords, I/O redirectors and semicolons
metacharactes => space, tab, newline, ;(,),<,>,| and &

2. Compound commands
Checks the first token to see if its a keyword with no quotes or backslashes. It can be opening keyword ( like if , { or () ie. compound command) or control structure middle ( like then, else, do ) , end ( fi , done )

3. Aliases
Checks the first word of each command against the list of aliases.
3.i) if match is found, substitutes the alias’s definition and goto Step 1
eg. ll becomes ‘ls -l *’ ### where alias ll=”ls -l *” defined already
3.ii) Otherwise goto Step 4

4. Brace expansion
Similar to pathname expansion except file names generated need not exist. Its a mechanism by which arbitrary strings may be generated.

eg. a{b,c} becomes ab ac.

5. Tilde expansion
If a word begins with an unquoted tilde character ( ~ ), the characters following the tilde are treated as a possible login name.
eg. cd ~joe becomes cd ‘/home/joe’ ### where /home/joe is the $HOME of user joe

6. Parameter substitution
The value of the parameter is substituted.
eg. # echo ${HOME} becomes ‘/home/joe’

7. Command substitution
Command name will be replaced with the standard output of the command . It is of two forms $(string) or `string`.
eg. # `which find` or $(which find) becomes ‘/usr/bin/find’

8. Arithmetic expression
Performs evaluation of an arithmetic expression and substitute the results. It is of the form $((string)).
eg.1 # $(($a+$b)) becomes ‘9’ ### where a=5; b=4

eg.2 # $(($(cat /tmp/file1 | wc -l) + $b)) becomes 7 ### calculate no. of lines in /tmp/file1 ( 3 lines ) and add it to the value of $b ( 4 )

9. Word splitting
Takes part of the line resulted from parameter, command and arithmetic substitution and splits them into word again using $IFS as delimiters instead of metacharacters used in step 1.

The default value of IFS is exactly [space][tab][newline]

10. Pathname expansion
Also known as filename generation or wildcard expansion. The shell scans for the characters *, ? and [ ie. pattern and replace it with an alphabetically sorted list of file names matching the pattern.
eg.1 # file* becomes ‘file1 file2 file3 file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt’

eg. 2 #file? becomes file1 file2 file3

11. Functions, Built-ins and $PATH

At this stage the command has been already split into words containing a simple command and optional list of arguments. And if that simple command ie. first word, contains no slashes ( not an absolute path ) , the shell will attempt to locate it in the following search order

11.i) Function
If there exists a function by that name, it ‘ll be invoked
11.ii) Built-in commands
If there exists a built-in command, it ‘ll be invoked
11.iii) Search $PATH
Finally searches each element of the path for directory containing the command name. The first file found will be chosen.

12. Redirection
Before a command is executed, its input and output may be redirected. Redirection operators < , > , <<, >>
eg. cat /tmp/file1 > /tmp/file2


Need for Speed: Undercover

April 26, 2009

I remember vaguely playing NFS first time around 2000. If I recall it well, I was stunned by the introduction video of the NFS : Hot Pursuit which captivated me to play the game till end, spending countless hours and sleepless nights. Since then my love for that game never faded, almost even after a decade NFS stayed top in my skimpy list of PC games.

One thing about NFS, starting from HOT Pursuit to Underground, Carbon Canyon to ProStreet, they all resemble a flick either ‘the Fast & the Furious’ sequel or ‘Gone in sixty seconds’ or you name it. Thats what makes it more interesting.

About NFS undercover:

The cops are back and this time ‘You ‘re the Cop’. Hey,  I’m not trying to confuse, remember though a cop, you’re in undercover, trying to be one of those bad gangs. The graphics, the plot and the choice of the cars everything is superb as usual. I’ve already finished the game once and started all again. Till the NFS:Shift been released, I guess I would play undercover couple of times.

Lets take the wheel, infiltrate them, take them out one by one.


My daughter’s graduation@Playschool

March 5, 2009

Its a wonderful experience watching your kid’s first graduation. Even more watching her performance on stage. I’ve started a blog for her own here where I post all wonderful happening in her life.